Friday, August 3, 2012

WHO's Osteoporosis Myth: The Dangers of High Bone Mineral Density

WHO's Osteoporosis Myth: The Dangers of High Bone Mineral Density
Aug 3, 2012 | Sayer Ji

The present-day definitions of Osteopenia and Osteoporosis were arbitrarily conceived by the World Health Organizatoin (WHO) in the early 90's and then projected upon millions of women's bodies seemingly in order to convince them they had a drug-treatable, though symptomless, disease.

Osteopenia (1992)[i] and Osteoporosis (1994)[ii] were formally identified as skeletal diseases by the WHO as bone mineral densities (BMD) 1 and 2.5 standard deviations, respectively, below the peak bone mass of an average young adult Caucasian female, as measured by an x-ray device known as Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, or DEXA).

This technical definition, now used widely around the world as the gold standard, is disturbingly inept, and as we shall see, likely conceals an agenda that has nothing to do with the promotion of health.

Deviant Standards: Aging Transformed Into a Disease

A 'standard deviation' is simply a quantity calculated to indicate the extent of deviation for a group as a whole, i.e. within any natural population there will be folks with higher and lower biological values, e.g. height, weight, bone mineral density, cholesterol levels. The choice of an average young adult female (approximately 30-year old) at peak bone mass in the human lifecycle as the new standard of normality for all women 30 or older, was, of course, not only completely arbitrary but also highly illogical. After all, why should a 80-year old's bones be defined as "abnormal" if they are less dense than a 30-year old's?

Read more..

No comments:

Post a Comment